Thursday, December 1, 2016

Reader Ready: Standard by Standard {RL 1.9: Compare and Contrast Characters in Stories}

Happy December, everyone!

Thanks for joining us for our last Reader Ready post for RL!  


Today we will look at RL 1.9; comparing and contrasting characters in stories.


The "Reader Ready" anchor chart we use for this standard is Capture the Character.   We explain that good readers think about the characters in the story.  We talk about how "capturing" a character is like taking a picture of them - to signify looking at the details about the character - their traits, adventures, and experiences.  Once students can get a clear picture of each character, they are able to compare and contrast the characters in the story / stories.  

{Capture the Character: a reader is always thinking about the characters in the story...we think about their adventures, experiences, and traits}


This is an anchor chart we leave hanging once we have introduced the idea of capturing the characters.  We put the headings, "same" and "different" for students to add post it notes 
so they can compare and contrast two characters.  As with most of our Reader Ready anchor charts, the post it notes are written and added by the students so they can take ownership of it.  This anchor chart can be used for 1 book or multiple books (which is how we use it).  We generally add post it's for read alouds, but also during Guided Reading as needed.


During Guided Reading, we provide practice with capturing the character.  We do this orally, using the anchor chart above, and the graphic organizers seen below.  

On this graphic organizer, the students (or teacher) selects two characters.  The students draw a picture of them, write their name, and then give a character trait that describes them.  They provide evidence as to why that character trait fits the character.  


On this graphic organizer, the students (or teacher) selects two characters.  The students give two examples of how they are the same and two examples of how they are different. We discuss how important it is to select similarities and differences that make an impact on the book - specific actions, experiences, or adventures.


**As a side note, for this standard we mostly choose one book / passage with two characters to compare and contrast, however, this standard can also apply to two books / passages.  Our favorite set of books to read if we use two books are both by Leo Lionni - The Alphabet Tree and Swimmy.  In these books, the character experiences are very similar (in both books the characters join together to become stronger / bigger), but there is also enough different that there can be great conversations.


For this standard, we use our RL 1.9 Print a Standard pack. Our Print a Standard packs each include over 10 activities. The activities can be done whole group, small group, or independently.  They are also great for assessments and homework.  With all of our Print a Standard packs, we use formats that are easy to use but engaging to the students. 


Some of our favorite RL 1.9 read aloud books: 


Frog and Toad // Beatrice Doesn't Want To
Stand Tall Molly Lou Melon // Stellaluna
Town Mouse Country Mouse // Recess Queen


Since this was our last Reader Ready post, we'd love to know from you - were they helpful?  Would you like to see more posts like this from other Common Core strands?

Have a great Holiday season!



Thursday, October 27, 2016

Reader Ready: Standard by Standard {RL 1.7 and 2.7: Using the Illustrations to Describe the Story}


Hello there, thanks for joining us for another Reader Ready post.  



Today we will look at RL 1.7 / 2.7; using illustrations in a story to describe its characters, setting, and events.


The "Reader Ready" anchor chart we use for this standard is Look Closely.   We explain that good readers look closely at the illustrations to gain understanding about the book.  We use the magnifying glass to signify looking at the details in the illustrations, such as, the feelings the characters are exhibiting, the location of the story, and problems that take place.  We stress the importance of using both illustrations and text while reading.

{Look Closely at the Illustrations: a reader is always looking at the illustrations...we think about what we see}


This is an anchor chart we leave hanging once we have introduced the idea of paying attention to illustrations in a book.  We divide the anchor chart into 3 parts; character(s), setting(s), and event(s).  Students write about something they noticed or learned about the book based on the illustrations.  They decide what the illustration helped it teach them about and they put the post it note in that section of the anchor chart.  Students write things like, 
--"On page 9, I saw the teacher had an angry face.  I think she is mad." 
 --"On page 16, I saw a tractor and a barn.  I think this story takes place on a farm." 
--"On page 3, I saw the boy next to his bike on the ground.  I think he fell off his bike."  
We should note here, that we use this during picture walks (so they infer), but also during reading as well (where they actually know what is happening in the text).  As with most of our Reader Ready anchor charts, the post it notes are written and added by the students so they can take ownership of it.  This anchor chart can be used for 1 book or multiple books (which is how we use it).  We generally add post it's for read alouds, but also during Guided Reading as needed.


During Guided Reading, we provide practice with looking closely at the illustrations.  We do this orally, using the anchor chart above, and the graphic organizer seen here.   On this page, students pick one illustration to draw from the story.  They write something they know based on the illustration they picked.



For this standard, we use our RL 1.7 and RL 2.7 Print a Standard packs. Our Print a Standard packs each include over 10 activities. The activities can be done whole group, small group, or independently.  They are also great for assessments and homework.  With all of our Print a Standard packs, we use formats that are easy to use but engaging to the students. 



For this standard, you can select books with very few or no words; we generally do a mix of wordless books and regular read alouds that have interesting illustrations.  Below are some of our favorite books with very few or no words:


Draw // The Snowman
Good Night, Gorilla // Lost. Found.
Pancakes for Breakfast // Tuesday


Our next Reader Ready post will be RL.9 (RL.8 does not pertain to primary grades); we will publish that post a bit late due to scheduling...better late than never! 

Have a great week!






Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Reader Ready: Standard by Standard {RL 1.6: Identify Who is Telling the Story}

We hope you are having a great week; welcome back for another Reader Ready post!


Today we'll look at RL 1.6; understanding who is telling the story  and who is talking in the story.


The "Reader Ready" anchor chart we use for this standard is Who's Talking.   We explain that good readers think about who is telling the story (at various points).   We don't go into point of view in great detail, but we do point out key words that tell you if the story is told by a narrator or a character.   We also talk about who is talking in the story and the purpose for their dialogue.  

{Who's Talking: a reader is always thinking of who is talking in the story...we think about the words they say}


This is an anchor chart we leave hanging once we have introduced the idea of paying attention to dialogue within books / text.  Students write what characters have said and why; for example: Ben said, "Go help your dad and go as quick as you can."  He said this because Ben's sister saw that Ben's dad was hurt.  As with most of our Reader Ready anchor charts, the post it notes are written and added by the students so they can take ownership of it.  This anchor chart can be used for 1 book or multiple books (which is how we use it).  We generally add dialogue after read alouds, but also during Guided Reading as needed.


During Guided Reading, we provide practice with identifying who is telling the story and looking at  characters'  dialogue.  We do this orally, using the anchor chart above, and the graphic organizer seen here. 


For this standard, we use our RL 1.6 Print a Standard pack.  Our Print a Standard packs each include over 10 activities. The activities can be done whole group, small group, or independently.  They are also great for assessments and homework.  With all of our Print a Standard packs,
 we use formats that are easy to use but engaging to the students. 


We also have a RL 2.6 Print a Standard pack.  The 2nd grade version is a bit more in depth, focusing more on character point of view.  

Some of our favorite read alouds for RL 1.6 (books from various "points of view"):


Fancy Nancy // Go Away Dog
Alexander and the Horrible, No Good Very Bad Day // Is Your Mama a Llama
How to Babysit a Grandpa // Skippyjon Jones


See you in 2 weeks! 



Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Reader Ready: Standard by Standard {RL 1.5: Books that Tell Stories and Books that Give Information}

Another Wednesday....another Reader Ready post!  


We are here today to talk about RL 1.5; understanding the differences between fiction and nonfiction.


The "Reader Ready" anchor chart we use for this standard is Checking for Text Type.   We explain that it is important to get your "brain ready" for the type of text you'll be reading - if you're reading fiction, be ready to pay close attention to the characters and the storyline, if you're reading nonfiction, be ready to play close attention to the facts and information given. 

{Checking for Text Type: a reader gets their brain ready to read...we think about the type of text we are reading}


This is an anchor chart we leave hanging once we've taught the two main text types; fiction and nonfiction.  We add post it notes with explanations of why certain books belong in the fiction or nonfiction category.  As with most of our Reader Ready anchor charts, the post it notes are written and added by the students so they can take ownership of it.  This anchor chart can be used for 1 book or multiple books (which is how we use it).  We generally add words after read alouds, but also during Guided Reading as needed.


During Guided Reading, we provide practice with identifying the text type as well.  This is a graphic organizer that requires students to identify three reasons the book is either fiction or nonfiction.  They also have to tell a reason the book is not the other text type.



For this standard, we use our RL 1.5 Print a Standard pack.  Our Print a Standard packs each include over 10 activities. The activities can be done whole group, small group, or independently.  They are also great for assessments and homework.  With all of our Print a Standard packs, we use formats that are easy to use but engaging to the students.  


Some of our favorite read alouds for RL 1.5 (our favorite nonfiction series for the primary grades):





See you in 2 weeks!  



Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Reader Ready: Standard by Standard {RL 1.4: Words that Appeal to the Senses and Words that Suggest Feelings}

Hi there!  Time for another Reader Ready post!


 We are here today to talk about RL 1.4; understanding that good readers think about the words in the story.


The "Reader Ready" anchor chart we use for this standard is our Word Window.  We explain that when you are reading, paying attention to words provides you with a "window" into what is happening in the story.   This standard focuses on two types of words, words that appeal to our senses and words that suggest feelings.  

{Word Window:  a reader is always thinking about the words in the story...we think about words that appeal to our senses or suggest feelings}


This is an anchor chart we leave hanging once we've taught the two different types of words we use to understand the text better.  We add post it notes with words we find that fit in the two categories.  As with most of our Reader Ready anchor charts, the post it notes are written and added by the students so they can take ownership of it.  This anchor chart can be used for 1 book or multiple books (which is how we use it).  We generally add words after read alouds, but also during Guided Reading as needed.


During Guided Reading, we generally focus on the two types of words separately, mainly so we get enough practice with both types of words.  

We focus on feeling words using this graphic organizer.  Students write how they think a character is feeling and WHY they think that.  They have to list specific words that they used to come to the conclusion of how the character felt. At the bottom of the page, there is space for the students to draw the character and label things they noticed the character saying OR doing (this can be things they notice in the pictures as well).




In the bottom example, the student wrote, "I think the teacher is tired.  I know because the words said puffed and panted." In the picture at the bottom, she drew the picture of the teacher and labeled with with the quote the teacher said ("Wait for me!"), she noted that her hand was on her head, that her eyes were closed, and that she was picturing the kids running ahead.  

We focus on the senses using this graphic organizer.  Students write words that appealed to the senses based on the book or poem they read.  Some of the senses have several examples and some have few (or none).  


For this standard, we use our RL 1.4 Print a Standard pack.  Our Print a Standard packs each include over 10 activities. The activities can be done whole group, small group, or independently.  They are also great for assessments and homework.  With all of our Print a Standard packs, we use formats that are easy to use but engaging to the students.  


The RL.4 Print a Standard packet for second grade covers the additional parts of the standard that aren't covered by the 1st grade standard (alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines, etc).


Some of our favorite read alouds for RL 1.4:


First Day Jitters // Bear Snores On
Stand Tall Molly Lou Melon // Fireflies // Llama Misses Mama
Night Owl // The Listening Walk


See you in 2 weeks!